Never trust a journalist, part 2598

Lu dans l’International Herald Tribune:

In many cases, these sales represent a cultural shift, as nations like Romania, Poland and Morocco, which have long relied on Russian-made MIG-17 fighter jets, are now buying new F-16s, built by Lockheed Martin.

Funny: last time I checked, la dernière fois que le Maroc avait acheté de l’équipement militaire lourd – avions, hélicoptères, chars, navires – c’était sous Mohammed V, et notamment ces Mig 17. Et voilà que l’International Herald Tribune place le Maroc aux côtés de la Pologne et de la Roumanie, membres du Pacte de Varsovie plus d’un quart de siècle après la livraison du dernier armement soviétique au Maroc, et alors que les Mig 17 achetés par le Maroc sont exposés dans des musées depuis également un quart de siècle…

Et s’il en est ainsi dans un domaine où l’on est en mesure d’exercer un minimum d’esprit critique, qu’en est-il dans d’autres domaines?

Toujours dans le même domaine russo-maghrébin, un autre article sur l’inquiétude occidentale face à l’activité commerciale russe en Afrique:

Northern Africa is already an especially important alternative source for European countries that fear over-reliance on Russian energy.

« Quietly, but with rising amounts of panic, we’re hearing officials from major European governments complain about what the Russians are doing, » said Jon Marks, editorial director of the industry newsletter Africa Energy.

Russia’s push goes beyond traditional allies that it supplied with weapons and money during the Cold War.

One of its biggest trading partners in Africa is Morocco, a staunch U.S. ally that supplies Russia with mineral phosphates consumed in large quantities for fertilizer.

But Russia also has shown that it wants to keep strong ties with Algeria, a former ally and a neighbor and rival to Morocco. The Kremlin agreed in 2006 to write off $4.7 billion of Cold War-era debt in exchange for a deal to sell Algeria combat jets, submarines, warships and missiles.

The Moroccan Memories in Britain – projet sur l’émigration marocaine au Royaume-Uni

Merci à Issandr pour le tuyau – l’émigration marocaine vers le Royaume-Uni est peut-être la plus ancienne en Europe, puisqu’elle date des commercants fassis qui s’étaient installés à Manchester vers le milieu du XIXeme:

The Moroccan Memories in Britain, a project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and organized by the Migrant and Refugee Communties’ Forum (MRCF), has collected more than 100 life histories across Britain depicting the experiences of three generations of British-Moroccans. The interviews will be deposited at the British Library Sound Archive. This is an important project as it brings to life the stories and the interconnected relations between Morocco and Britain that hasn’t been documented until now.

As part of the project, we will be having a national touring exhibit, beginning with a launch at the British Library on Monday 1st of December 2008. This exhibit will travel within London, St. Albans, Crawley, Trowbridge, Manchester and finishing in Edinburgh.

Also, there is a documentary about the project being filmed by award-winning filmmaker Saeed Taji-Farouky. The Moroccan Memories project is the brain-child of Dr. Myriam Cherti, a leading expert on the British-Moroccan community who has recently published a book through the Amsterdam University Press entitled Paradoxes of Social Capital: A Multi-Generational Study of Moroccans in London.

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Regarding the launch, we have enclosed a press release and dates when the exhibition will be travelling. If you could please circulate this among your newsgroup we would like to see those interested at furture events.

For more information about the project, please visit our website which is listed down below this message.

Looking forward to your response.

Best wishes:
Sanaz


Moroccan Memories in Britain
Migrant and Refugee Communities Forum
2 Thorpe Close, London W10 5XL

Tel: +44(0)20 8962 3045
Fax: +44(0)20 8986 1692

www.moroccanmemories.org.uk

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